Transport Theory

Ford Focus Electric to begin production

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Ford says it expects its electric Focus to be the first 5-seater EV to get a 100MPGe fuel rating.After much industry buzz, Ford announced on Wednesday that it is starting to produce its Focus Electric - an all-electric version of its popular model. The Focus Electric will be the automaker's first all-electric passenger car, and the company says it expects it to be the first EV 5-seater to get a 100MPGe fuel rating (that's a consumption equivalent of 100 miles per gallon). Ford also says the car will feature faster charging technology with a 240-volt charging station, allowing the car to charge fully in three to four hours - half the time it takes to charge up a Nissan Leaf. The Michigan-based automaker is emphasizing the cost effectiveness of owning a Focus Electric as opposed to a conventional vehicle. For instance, the company estimates that it would cost a driver $2.10 to drive 80 miles (based on the average cost of a kilowatt-hour, $3.30), while a 30mpg conventional vehicle would cost $8.80 for the same distance (based on a per gallon cost of $3.30). The Focus Electric is expected to top out at a maximum speed of 84 mph. The Focus Electric will be produced at Ford's Wayne, Mich., assembly plant. Units will initially be available in California and the New York area, with availability expected to expand in 2012 to include the following markets: Atlanta; Austin and Houston, Texas; Boston; Chicago; Denver; Detroit; Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz.; Portland, Ore.; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Richmond, Va.; Seattle; and Washington, D.C.

After much industry buzz, Ford announced on Wednesday that it is beginning production on its Focus Electric - an a zero-emissions version of its popular model.

The Focus Electric will be the automaker's first all-electric passenger car, and the company says it expects it to be the first EV 5-seater to get a 100MPGe fuel rating (that's a consumption equivalent of 100 miles per gallon).

Ford also says the car will feature faster charging technology with a 240-volt charging station, allowing the car to charge fully in three to four hours - half the time it takes to charge up a Nissan Leaf.

The Michigan-based automaker is emphasizing the cost effectiveness of owning a Focus Electric as opposed to a conventional vehicle. For instance, the company estimates that it would cost a driver $2.10 to drive 80 miles (based on the average cost of a kilowatt-hour, $3.30), while a 30 mpg conventional vehicle would cost $8.80 for the same distance (based on a per-gallon cost of $3.30). The Focus Electric is expected to top out at a maximum speed of 84 mph.

The Focus Electric will be produced at Ford's Wayne, Mich., assembly plant. Units will initially be available in California and the New York area, with availability expected to expand in 2012 to 15 other markets, including: Atlanta; Austin and Houston, Texas; Boston; Chicago; Denver; Detroit; Orlando, Fla.; Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz.; Portland, Ore.; Raleigh-Durham, N.C.; Richmond, Va.; Seattle; and Washington, D.C.

Photos: Ford

via [Ford, CarScoop]

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Channtal Fleischfresser

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Channtal Fleischfresser has worked for The Economist, WNET/Channel 13, Al Jazeera English, Wall Street Journal and Associated Press. She holds degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She is based in New York. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure