Thinking Tech

Verizon FiOS user clocks speeds above 300 Mbps online

Verizon FiOS user clocks speeds above 300 Mbps online

Posting in Cities

FiOS user snubs former ISP, shows how to get 300 Mbps out of his home Internet connection with no bandwidth caps in sight.

Proving that too much is never enough, a Verizon FiOS user posted recently on DSLReports about his successful experiment squeezing speeds in excess of 300 megabits per second (Mbps) out of his Internet connection. The user is apparently bonding two 150 Mbps FiOS lines together to get the insane downstream speeds, and says he is paying a little over $400 per month to do it. Upstream speeds are reportedly maxing out at 150 Mbps.

In a U.S. market where the average broadband service from most providers tops out somewhere between roughly 4 and upwards of 15 Mbps (depending on whose data you believe), 300 Mbps is beyond most users’ comprehension. Not only that, but broadband caps being what they are, most consumers would hit a monthly bandwidth ceiling in a hot minute if they ever actually achieved said Internet speeds. Verizon FiOS, however, is an outlier among Internet service providers (ISPs). FiOS still offers unlimited Internet, meaning subscribers can stream and download content to their hearts’ content without ever getting charged for overages.

As the speed demon in question so eloquently put it when comparing FiOS to his former ISP Cox Communications, “Screw your caps Cox. I will take my FiOS thank you very much…”

Meanwhile, if you want to test out bonding FiOS lines yourself, consider that there are some equipment requirements. The FiOS user posting on the DSLReports forum notes that he has a router with an Intel Core i3-2120T processor. Other commenters on the boards speculate he is bonding the FiOS connections using a virtual private network.

Share this

Mari Silbey

Contributing Editor

Mari Silbey is an independent tech writer based in Washington, D.C. With a background in cable and telecom, she's a contributor to several trade publications, and part of the GigaOM analyst network. She also writes for the long-running digital media blog Zatz Not Funny, and has written for both corporate and association clients focused on broadband networks, mobile apps, and video delivery. She's a graduate of Duke University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure