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New Nike shoes measure jump shot, speed, performance

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On Wednesday, Nike announced an expansion of its digital footwear line and introduced their Nike+ line which allows both professional and recreational athletes to measure their performance.

Image Credit: Nike

On Wednesday, Nike announced an expansion of its digital footwear line and introduced their Nike+ line which allows both professional and recreational athletes to measure performance. The Nike+ Basketball and Training shoes come equipped with a new Nike+ Pressure Sensor that collects data and sends it to a smart phone, allowing customers to see results previously only viewed in the research lab.

The sensor comprises four different sensors placed in the sole of the shoe in locations at the toe, ball, and heel of the foot. This allows it to measure pressure and acceleration, thereby enabling it to provide statistics like vertical jump, speed and power: different metrics that the company says will deliver customers, "previously unknown information about either their workout or their game."

The Nike+ Basketball program helps players track their game, and also lets them share stats with others via social media.

Those looking to get more out of their everyday workout can opt for Nike+ Training, which "is designed to turn working out into a game." The program provides both workouts and feedback on the mobile application, and also allows users to interact via social networks.

The Nike Hyperdunk+, which will be worn by LeBron James this summer, will be the first shoe to feature the basketball technology. Nike+ Training enabled shoes will be available at the end of June.

[via Gizmodo]

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Jenny Wilson

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Jenny Wilson is a freelance journalist based in Chicago. She has written for Time.com and Swimming World Magazine and served stints at The American Prospect and The Atlantic Monthly magazines. She is currently pursuing a degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure