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Infographic: Where the green jobs are

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A new report suggests that the green economy hasn't quite materialized as the panacea many had hoped.

When President Barack Obama and his fellow democrats swept into office, they did so under the banner of job creation, specifically touting green jobs as the way forward.

It appeared, at the time, like the perfect win-win kill -two-birds-with one stone answer to some of the nation's most pressing problems. The economy was reeling. Climate change was becoming an ever dire situation. And soaring gas prices was again setting the stage for a renewed call for America to wean off of foreign oil.

It's nearly four years later and a new report entitled "Sizing the Clean Economy," issued by the Brookings Institute, a non-partisan think tank, suggests that the green economy hasn't quite materialized as the panacea many had hoped. In 2010, the industry added 2.7 million jobs in the fields of wind, solar and hydro-electric power and other related sectors that confers benefits to the environment. And since 2003, the green economy has grown at a rate of 3.4 percent, a tad lower than the nation's overall 4.2 percent growth rate.

Despite these sobering numbers, the report revealed that the sector was making major strides. It's one of the fastest growing economies, outpacing even fossil fuels (2.4 million jobs).

But where are these green jobs? To answer this question, the institute has generated an interactive map that displays the relative growth of jobs throughout various geographic areas in the U.S. You can peruse how many green jobs were added by city, state or by specific sectors like renewable energy. The dark green regions designate the top performing cities and states.

Take a look at the map at http://www.brookings.edu/metro/Clean_Economy/Map.aspx and tell me how well is your city doing?

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Tuan Nguyen

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Tuan C. Nguyen is a freelance science journalist based in New York City. He has written for the U.S. News and World Report, Fox News, MSNBC, ABC News, AOL, Yahoo! News and LiveScience. Formerly, he was reporter and producer for the technology section of ABCNews.com. He holds degrees from the University of California Los Angeles and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Follow him on Twitter. Disclosure