Thinking Tech

Behold! The world's skinniest house

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An architect is challenging our preconceived notions of how much space is needed to live comfortably.

Jakub Szczesny is about to challenge our preconceived notions of how much space is needed to live comfortably.

The Polish architect is currently constructing a house in Warsaw, Poland that will eventually be the world's skinniest house. Located in an alley between an apartment building and tower, the seriously humble abode measures 40 feet long, but less than five feet wide.

The really impressive part is that his design team has managed to squeeze in a bedroom, living room, bathroom and kitchen within the new four-story home (There's also enough room to fit an incredibly tiny 3-D printer). The designers had originally planned to include a staircase, but the cramped dimensions forced them to opt for ladders instead.

"I saw the gap and just thought it needed filling. It will be used by artists," Szczesny told the Daily Mail.

The current record holder is The Wedge, a building that measures 47 inches wide in the front, but expands as you move towards the back. It's located on the island of Great Cumbrae in Scotland and was also built at the site of an alley way.

In case anyone is wondering if there is a vacancy for this new place, you're out of luck. The new resident will be an Israeli writer named Etgar Keret, who obviously isn't even a tad bit claustrophobic.

But if you don't mind living in New York, the state's skinniest home has just been put up for sale for a cool $4.3 million dollars.

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(via Daily Mail, MSNBC)

Image: Centrala design

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Tuan Nguyen

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Tuan C. Nguyen is a freelance science journalist based in New York City. He has written for the U.S. News and World Report, Fox News, MSNBC, ABC News, AOL, Yahoo! News and LiveScience. Formerly, he was reporter and producer for the technology section of ABCNews.com. He holds degrees from the University of California Los Angeles and the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism. Follow him on Twitter. Disclosure