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The Morning Briefing: Drug development

The Morning Briefing: Drug development

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"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-reads from the web. This morning we're reading about drug development and innovation.

"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-reads from the web. This morning we're reading about drug development and innovation.

1.) Profit from the next innovative class of drugs. Innovation in drug development comes in waves. Important discoveries often lead to not just one drug, but a multitude. Understanding the biology of a disease, for instance, can often lead to multiple drug candidates, sometimes improving on each other and other times just rehashing the same mechanism.

2.) FDA delays decision on Pfizer, Bristol-Myers drug. Shares of Pfizer Inc. and Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. fell Monday after federal regulators unexpectedly delayed for a second time a decision on whether to approve the companies' highly touted experimental anticlotting drug Eliquis.

3.) Experimental insulin drug prevents low blood sugar. An experimental insulin drug prevented low blood sugar among diabetic patients more often than a popular drug on the market, a new study finds.

4.) Pfizer's internal emails reveal it fudged info about its blockbuster painkiller. Recently released internal emails reveal that Pfizer Inc.'s employees misled consumers about dangers tied to its hugely popular arthritis drug Celebrex.

5.) Drugmakers seek EU deal to keep supplies flowing. The head of Europe's drug industry has written to EU leaders ahead of their summit this week seeking major concessions to help keep supplies of medicines flowing to crisis-hit countries like Greece and Spain.

Image credit: Derek Gravy

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Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure