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Lego bricks made from tea leaves and coffee beans?

Posting in Design

Lego bricks are an iconic child's toy -- what happens when you make them out of coffee beans and tea leaves?

Japanese company Colors Toyko have designed a new way to recreate the traditional toy in many children's toy boxes -- Lego.

We may wish to turn to more sustainable material, however, plastic remains a very common material used within toy production, from cars to basic building blocks. However, perhaps there may be a future in using more natural, sustainable materials to keep our children amused. How about tea leaves, sawdust or coffee beans?

Image credit: (c) Colors Tokyo

'Colors' Tokyo as a company that applies natural materials and techniques to traditional products, collaborating with designers to produce work that does not have to rely on common, modern techniques. By choosing an iconic child's toy and giving it a sustainable twist, the company highlighted their wish to 'promote a recycling-orientated society'.

Manufactured in Japan, the lego-like blocks are composed out of cedar tree bark, cedar wood shavings and dust, coffee beans and green tea leaves. Dubbed 'Earth Toy Earth Blocks', each separate block measures in at 1 1/4 in long, 5/8 wide and x 5/8 high.

According to website Treehugger, the materials are bound together through the use of recyclable polypropylene. Each brick is currently available in one size and colour by purchasing online -- 'CedarDust' -- and one set contains 50 pieces. The edges are slightly curved to prevent children from accidentally cutting themselves.

You can purchase this product from the Guggenheim museum, and each set will put you back $30.00. A nice gift for plastic-wary parents to give their children.

Images credit: Colors Toyko

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Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure