Smart Takes

How green is your company? (Infographic)

How green is your company? (Infographic)

Posting in Design

How green are the policies of top corporations, and can you really earn more in the renewables industry?

A new infographic released by Jobvine has collated information on what the 'green' economy is, and how businesses are beginning to react to changes within the energy sector.

Green industry investments are becoming more frequent, by both governmental bodies and corporations, with millions of dollars now invested each year. Due to this, all industries are affected in some manner, and many are altering their business models to accommodate the changes.

More than before, companies are becoming more dedicated to sustainability models -- whether because of the potential of the green industry, or a requirement due to changing regulations. If you're looking for a change of job, according to Jobvine's data, you could hope to earn an average 13 percent more than in other industries.

7 out of 10 top 'green' companies come from the technology industry:

  • Google has been completely carbon neutral since 2007.
  • Dell maintains a recycle and reuse rate of 95.7 percent.
  • Apple's products make up a staggering 98 percent of its carbon footprint.
  • Nokia has been buying renewable energy sources since 2006, and built its own installations in 2011.
  • Microsoft plans to reduce its carbon footprint by 30 percent by 2012.
  • Hewlett Packard promised to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 40 percent lower than 2005 levels, something it achieved ahead of schedule.
  • IBM has run a policy designed to help it maintain position as an environmental leader in business -- which is why it achieved 82.5 percent, the top spot, in the rankings below.

Infographic courtesy of Jobvine

Related on SmartPlanet:

Share this

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure