Smart Takes

Floating city for startups makes waves among entrepreneurs

Floating city for startups makes waves among entrepreneurs

Posting in Cities

Over one hundred startups have expressed interest in moving their operations to international waters, allowing foreign workers to stay close to Silicon Valley.

Blueseed, the startup ship that will bring Silicon Valley to the open waters, is quickly gaining steam among entrepreneurs. The company recently released a report announcing that it already has 133 startup firms interested in becoming tenants of its floating city.

Of this group of interested entrepreneurs, 38 percent say they would be ready to move in now and 30 percent say they would be ready to set sail within the next six months.

The idea behind the company is to provide tech startups with an atmosphere in which they can perfect their products and produce new ideas in the company of like-minded individuals. The main draw is that the “city” will float on international waters, making it possible for tech professionals all over the world to stay close to the hub of innovation—Silicon Valley.

Because the vessel will sit only 12 miles from the coast of San Francisco, international entrepreneurs will only need tourist or short-term business visas, not tough-to-get work visas, to stay on board. By creating more space for foreign workers, the company’s creators hope the ship will fill a big void in the U.S. economy.

“Instead of reinventing the wheel, Blueseed will extend Silicon Valley to the world, fueling innovation, economic growth, and job creation that would otherwise not exist due to immigration restrictions,” the company states on its website, also providing the example that each year, the U.S. has 38,000 new graduates in computer science but creates a massive 144,000 job openings in the field. Blueseed, its creators claim, will help fill that gap with international workers who were previously unable to stay in the U.S. for lack of a work visa.

The company also says that its ship will help workers in the U.S. by providing jobs for Americans ranging from vessel crew to legal advising.

Investors, entrepreneurs, engineers and developers will be able to live and work on the ship for a monthly rate of $1,200 per person, a price that includes living quarters and office space. Ferries will be available daily to transport the professionals back to San Francisco daily.

While the company has yet to purchase a ship for the endeavor, it has drawn up a few vessel ideas. It is set to take off by third quarter 2013.

[via Venture Beat, Popular Science]

Images: Blueseed

Share this

Sarah Korones

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Sarah Korones is a freelance writer based in New York. She has written for Psychology Today and Boston's Weekly Dig. She holds a degree from Tufts University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure