Smart Takes

Advanced LED lights attempt to break into city markets

Posting in Architecture

An advanced LED lighting system is trying to break into the street light market.

Cree, LED lighting designer and manufacturer, has released advanced-design and traditional LED streetlights in an attempt to promote the adoption of efficient lighting on our streets.

The company specializes in lighting-class LEDs, lighting, and semiconductors for wireless and power applications. Now, it is attempting to use high-class design to encourage authorities to use LED technology more widely in cities.

A new line of streetlights has recently been announced; designed with long-lasting and energy-efficient use in mind. The modern LEDs include AeroBlade lamps that encompass clusters of LED light sources in blade-like strips; distributing light in a uniform manner.

The modern design of these street lights may not be to every city's taste; especially those with a historical heritage. Therefore, Cree has subsequently designed a more traditional bulb design to fit with the theme of these areas.

LEDs are strong contenders to be used on city streets; owing to their durability and more efficient generation of light. However, such products do come with a higher up-front cost than traditional lighting.

Cree vice president and general manager Christopher Ruud said:

"It's not an inexpensive job to change a light bulb -- that's where the payback is."

Rudd says the payback from this latest, slightly cheaper line is usually within a few years -- requiring less maintenance than other models.

In a cash-strapped economy, many local authorities and consumers would struggle with the starting costs, even though in the long term such LED products would save expenditure on lighting.

(via CNET)

Image credit: CREE

Related:

Related video on SmartPlanet:

[video=6337127]

Share this

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure