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NASA, researchers: Antarctic ice loss at least 10 gigatons a year for last decade

 NASA, researchers: Antarctic ice loss at least 10 gigatons a year for last decade

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Researchers with an assist from NASA have mapped how much glacial ice is moving to sea after a collapse of an Antarctic ice shelf.

Researchers with an assist from NASA have mapped how much glacial ice is moving to sea after a collapse of an Antarctic ice shelf.

NASA said the aim of the project is to detail ice losses and then predict sea level impacts as Antarctic ice breaks away.

Researchers from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), the Laboratoire d'Etudes en Geophysique et Oceanographie Spatiales, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique at the University of Toulouse, France, and the University of Colorado's National Snow and Ice Data Center, Boulder, Colo., were involved with the project.

The group combined NASA's satellite data with information from CNES, the French space agency, and mapped it against previous ice shelf losses in 1995, 2001, 2002 and 2009. The upshot: Antarctic ice loss was 11.2 gigatons a year from 2001 to 2006 and 10.2 gigatons from 2006 to 2010.

Here's a look at the Larsen B ice shelf collapse from 2002 and there's an animation at NASA.

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Larry Dignan

Editor-in-Chief

Editor-in-Chief Larry Dignan is editor-in-chief of SmartPlanet and ZDNet. He is also editorial director of TechRepublic. Previously, he was an editor at eWeek, Baseline and CNET News. He has written for WallStreetWeek.com, Inter@ctive Week, New York Times and Financial Planning. He holds degrees from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the University of Delaware. He is based in New York but resides in Pennsylvania. Follow him on Twitter. Disclosure