Decoding Design

The vanishing briefcase

Posting in Technology

Books and newspapers aren't the only things disappearing because of electronic media.

Books and newspapers aren't the only things disappearing because of electronic media. In the business world, the briefcases that once carried papers and documents have been replaced by sleeker, slimmer bags for both men and women.

Kara Scannell and Stuart Kirk report on the bag preferences of fashionable businesspeople of New York for the Financial Times:

“The world has changed,” echoes Peggy Foran, a top lawyer at Prudential Financial. The bag “has to be utilitarian these days. A briefcase that will only fit a few papers is not as efficient.” Plus, bustling through the streets of New York has another requirement. “You want to be able to use your hands,” she adds.

Still, some luxury brands are releasing briefcases as retro-cool or classic statements. Carrying the cases is a serious style commitment considering the boxy shape, weight, and hardware. Will the traditional symbol of first year law associates and banker boys be relegated to ironic accessories of hipsters?

Briefcase encounter [Financial Times]

Image: lisadragon Flickr

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Sun Kim

Contributing Editor

Contributing Editor Sun Joo Kim is an architect and creative consultant based in Boston. Her projects include design and master planning of museums, public institutions, hospitals, and university buildings across the U.S. She holds a degree from Carnegie Mellon University and is a member of the U.S. Green Building Council. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure