Decoding Design

Scanbox turns your smartphone into a portable scanner

Scanbox turns your smartphone into a portable scanner

Posting in Design

Scanbox is a device that turns your smartphone into a convenient portable scanner that can scan photos, 3D objects, and act as a copier.

Another day, another successful Kickstarter project. It simply cannot be overstated how great that site can be for helping innovative and possibly disruptive ideas become reality. One of the latest Kickstarter darlings has already been 630 percent funded with thirty-three days left to go.

Scanbox, created by Australians Phil Bosua, Ben Hillier and Luke Allen, is a portable device that turns your smartphone (or any smartphone with a back camera) into a convenient scanner that can scan photos, as a copier, or to digitize receipts.

The designers came up with Scanbox as a solution to the problems that most of us have with scanners these days-- we own them but we rarely use them, they take up space and collect dust. Mainly, their size and price make them more of a hassle than they are worth. Scanbox was designed to be unpacked and packed up again (and is small enough to fit easily into a briefcase or laptop bag) in just a few seconds.

The Scanbox unfolds from a flatpack, snapping together with high-strength magnets to make a scanner platform, and was designed to optimize almost all lighting conditions to make the final product come out clean. Even so, the designers have made a "Plus" model that is equipped with thin LED lights to counteract shadows.

Scanbox can also scan 3D objects for that Ebay product shot and can be used as a live projector for presentations. It's even optimized for facial recognition for scanned photos. And, it comes in six bright colors for personalization, which is an important part of today's gadget marketplace.

Here's how it works:

It's pretty obvious, having raised almost $80,000 of their $12,500 goal that there is a great desire for this product.

[Design.org]
Images: Scanbox

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Beth Carter

Contributing Editor

Beth Carter is a freelance journalist based in San Francisco. She has worked for Catalyst magazine, the New York Times Syndicate, BBC Travel and Wired. She holds degrees from the University of Oregon and New York University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure