Decoding Design

Pulse: A beautiful urban bike concept, built for safety

Pulse: A beautiful urban bike concept, built for safety

Posting in Architecture

Not your average classic commuter bike, this concept by Teague glows at night.

Bicycle safety is an important issue, and as more cyclists hit the streets, more designers are coming up with ways to make car-less commuting safer--and as a result, more stylish.

Pulse, a new urban bicycle concept by design firm Teague, is described by the firm as "Equal parts gym membership, fashion statement and Kyoto Pact contributor, Pulse is a transportation solution with in sync with the needs of today's urban denizen."

The concept does well to mix form and function: the middle of the bike's frame is coated with photo-luminescent powder so it glows cooly and safely when the bike is ridden at night. Pulse was designed for and tested in an urban setting, judged by a commute of 3.2 miles that was "balanced between urban congestion and suburban side road. Half downhill blitz, half persistent climb; the journey demands efficiency and durability."

Inspired by two-seater classics like "the Fixie and the Fighter," the motorcycle's influence is evident in the handlebar-end LED turn signals that have removable and rechargeable batteries that can be charged with a micro USB cell-phone charger.

And the fixie? A nice thing about Pulse bike is that it still looks like a classic commuter bike, and would be unlikely to turn off those who are not looking to make a statement. Sometimes there just shouldn't have to be a choice usability and good design.

Teague's video demonstration of the Pulse Concept:

TEAGUE Pulse from TEAGUE on Vimeo.

[Design.org]
Images and video: Teague

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Beth Carter

Contributing Editor

Beth Carter is a freelance journalist based in San Francisco. She has worked for Catalyst magazine, the New York Times Syndicate, BBC Travel and Wired. She holds degrees from the University of Oregon and New York University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure