Decoding Design

Ingenious meeting-space design for Danish bank's HQ

Posting in Architecture

The stylish new building features suspended conference rooms and other beautiful, yet functional, spaces.

This building, designed for Danish bank Nykredit's new headquarters in Copenhagen, is truly cool. It's a ten-story glass cube that overlooks Copenhagen Harbor, now one of the city's largest office buildings, that features an incredible atrium that floods the structure with natural sunlight.

In this atrium are glass elevators, staircases, walkways and balconies, creating a design-oriented and lively work-environment. The coolest features of all, however, are the suspended meeting rooms that are visible from almost everywhere in the building.

The building was designed by Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects, and it features a total of three such rooms cantilevered over the atrium that overlook a giant bronze sculpture by Per Kirkeby.

The building also is home to a beautiful sculpture by artist Anita Jørgensen and an auditorium, as well as murals and decorations by other artists.

While ascetically innovative and elegant, the building's design is also environmentally considerate. Despite being completely covered in glass, thermal load is reduced by using the water from Copenhagen Harbor to cool off the building.

The double layer facade is also designed with sections that can be opened and closed to provide the building with natural ventilation, and the roof panels also open to cool the building naturally.

Mostly, this building's concept of meeting spaces, from the floating conference room to the open auditorium are stunning-- and safe-- especially in a place like Denmark that isn't known to be fault-ridden or earthquake prone.

More images below:

[Core 77]

Images: Schmidt Hammer Lassen Architects

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Beth Carter

Contributing Editor

Beth Carter is a freelance journalist based in San Francisco. She has worked for Catalyst magazine, the New York Times Syndicate, BBC Travel and Wired. She holds degrees from the University of Oregon and New York University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure