Decoding Design

Condense your wallet and keys into a sleek money clip, so you can lose both at once

Condense your wallet and keys into a sleek money clip, so you can lose both at once

Posting in Cities

Looking to simplify? The Keylet is a new way to condense your keys and wallet in to one small, pretty money clip.

Wallet, cell phone, keys. This trifecta of necessities, add a lip balm and maybe a sweater here and there, comes with me everywhere. In fact, I don't leave the house without them. In yet another Kickstarter campaign, two designers from Orange County, California have invented a product to to reduce the big three to two. One less thing to remember, or if you are me, to rifle around in your purse for.

The Keylet is basically a credit card shaped money clip with a simple innovation: a hinged key between the two plates of clip, sized to conceal a key of your choosing.

Unlike a card and key carrying iPhone case, this affords you the opportunity to carry 2/3 of your valuables separately. The clean, stainless steel design is slim and stylish enough to carry regularly and not be embarrassed of in fancier situations.

Perfect for city-dwelling minimalists without cars or thousands of keys on the keychain, or for those who just want to reduce the bulk for an evening (smaller purse needs smaller items), or for anyone in between, but not always practical for those who can't shed the extra stuff.

Also, consider this: If you lose your wallet, there go your apartment keys and you've lost two often invaluable items all at once. Keylet even will streamline your disastrous moments.

When posed to the masses in the form of a Kickstarter campaign, the masses overwhelmingly showed their support. As of writing this, the project had 24 more days to reach their goal, of $42,500. Using their wallets--which may become obsolete once they receive their Keylets-- 810 backers have already pledged $55,690.

[Kickstarter]
Images via Keylet

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Beth Carter

Contributing Editor

Beth Carter is a freelance journalist based in San Francisco. She has worked for Catalyst magazine, the New York Times Syndicate, BBC Travel and Wired. She holds degrees from the University of Oregon and New York University. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure