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Waste not, want not list: San Francisco ranks as 'least wasteful' U.S. city

Waste not, want not list: San Francisco ranks as 'least wasteful' U.S. city

Posting in Cities

Sponsored research gauges attitudes and actions of urban Americans when it comes to environmentally-friendly behavior

Nalgene, which makes its money off selling reusable containers of all sorts, like water bottles, has published a list of America's 25 most and least wasteful cities.

San Francisco, the city by the bay, represents the "least" end of the spectrum, due to the tendency of its citizens to use its public transportation, conserve water and make use of recycling and waste management programs.

Houston winds up at No. 25, for pretty much the opposite types of behavior.

The top five cities were:

  • San Francisco, Calif.
  • Seattle, Wash.
  • New York, N.Y.
  • Portland, Ore.
  • Boston, Mass.

The bottom five were:

  • Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Tampa, Fla.
  • Atlanta, Ga.
  • Cleveland, Ohio
  • Houston, Texas

The ranking was based on a survey of 3,750 urban Americans living in the 25 biggest metros in the United States.

The executive summary notes that three out of four of those surveyed would give the national overall a "C" (that's average, folks) when it comes to environmental responsibility and action. While those surveyed are using public transportation less (bad!), more of them are more actively participating in recycling programs, looking for more energy-efficient options such as light bulbs, and leaving their car at home whenever possible.

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Heather Clancy

Section Editor

Heather Clancy has written for United Press International, ZDNet, Entrepreneur, Fortune Small Business, the International Herald Tribune and the New York Times. She holds a degree from McGill University. She is based in New Jersey. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure