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The Morning Briefing: Space and satellites

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"The Morning Briefing" is SmartPlanet's daily roundup of must-reads from the web. This morning we're reading about space and satellites.

1.) Nasa back in contact with the International Space Station. Nasa ground controllers have re-established contact with the International Space Station less than three hours after a computer failure briefly interrupted communication.

2.) Sun-powered space lasers, gravity tractor beams, or a nuclear device - how to stop asteroids and meteors from hitting the earth. After the week in which an asteroid passed a mere 17,000 miles from the earth, and a meteor injured over a thousand people in Russia one scientist warns 'duck and cover' is not an option

3.) Mysterious 'space slime' thought to be from Russian meteorite turns out to be unfertilised frog spawn. With a meteorite causing chaos in Russia and an asteroid passing closer to Earth than ever before, last week was a particularly strange and eventful one. But none more so than on Ham Wall Nature reserve in Somerset, were scientists were left baffled by an unusual 'slime'.

4.) Space station's dark matter hunter coy about findings. What a tease. A high-profile dark matter-hunting experiment that sits atop the International Space Station allegedly has interesting results – but its researchers are not telling.

5.) The wonders of detailed satellite imagery. Satellite imagery has a very important part to play in weather. It not only allows us to see what is happening right now, it also gives invaluable information that can be put into weather computer models to predict what is going to happen in the future.

Image credit: NASA

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— By on February 19, 2013, 5:05 PM PST

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure