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Tesla hires for autonomous vehicles research

Posting in Transportation

The possibilities of autonomous driving solutions are being explored by a number of companies, and Tesla has decided to dive in.

Google, Continental, IBM and Nissan are merely some of the tech giants and automakers researching and developing ways for us to have autonomous cars on our roads. Tesla has now joined the fray, seeking staff to help create its own autonomous solution.

Posted on the automaker's Career page, the job posting asks for an "Advanced Driver Assistance Systems Controls Engineer" to work out of Tesla's headquarters at the Palo Alto Deer Creek office.

The full-time role's description states:

As an Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) Controls Engineer, you will be responsible for developing vehicle-level decision-making and lateral and longitudinal control strategies for Tesla’s effort to pioneer fully automated driving. You will also be responsible for developing algorithm validation methods that reduce development time and improve confidence in our strategies.

In addition, the engineer will be expected to develop architectures and control algorithms for driver assistance systems, models and testing for the technology, and research into the powertrain and vehicle systems to meet functional safety expectations.

Tesla expects its applicants to have experience and understanding in autonomous driving technologies, sensors such as radar, camera, ultrasonic, and lidar, vehicle dynamics controls and data analysis.

Last month, a report from Navigant Research estimated that sales of fully autonomous cars will grow from 8,000 per year in 2020 to 95.4 million per year in 2035, or will account for 75 percent of all light-duty vehicle sales.

Via: Wired

Image credit: Tesla

— By on September 18, 2013, 12:57 AM PST

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure