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Why engineers believe they are on the road to millions

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The majority of engineers believe they are destined to become millionaires, according to new research.

In a survey of 1,000 software developers conducted by code-automation company Chef, the firm discovered that the majority of working engineers believe their role is free from common worries -- such as economic downturns -- and they are some of the most valued employees in today's modern workplace.

In total, 69 percent of respondents said their roles were "recession-proof," and 91 percent said they feel they are the "most valued" employees at their firm.

Over half -- 56 percent -- believe they will become millionaires eventually. Developers recognize their growing value, according to the report, and expect to be compensated accordingly. However, 84 percent already feel they are being paid what they are worth.

Why? It all comes down to perceived skills value. While software engineers once stayed in the background and shored up infrastructures that kept businesses ticking over, in the digital age, more venture capital firms than ever are seeking out companies founded and run by engineers -- who are now seen as the "power class," an influential group in both business and society that represent ideas and innovation.

"As business requirements changed, developers were uniquely suited to configure the enterprise for the digital economy, thereby pulling them up from basements and into boardrooms, and giving them a more prominent role in everyday culture," the survey states.

Read the report here.

 

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Read on: Re.Code

Image credit: Flickr

— By on April 16, 2014, 6:07 AM PST

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure