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The Bulletin

Forget fingerprints, blink and stare to access your computer

Posting in Education

Biometric technology has great potential, but what if you could access your gadgets with no more effort than a blink or flick of your gaze?

Tobii and Dell have partnered to launch and integrate Tobii EyeMobile, a solution built to introduce eye-tracking technology on tablet computers. Built for users with physical impairments in mind, the technology allows users hands-free access to the tablet, apps, the Internet, e-books and social media by using natural and relaxed eye movements.

Oscar Werner, president of Tobii Assistive Technology commented:

"The Tobii EyeMobile is powerful because it will enable millions of people with physical disabilities to live more independently, engage with others via internet and social media, and even get back to work and attend education programs."

The hands-free solution will be available on the Dell Latitude 10 tablet, and the eye-tracking technology is due for launch at the end of this year. Aside from helping those with physical disabilities, Dell says that the technology could also be used by companies to develop adverts, websites and games to study and analyze what areas of the graphic their audience focuses on.

Werner said:

"We decided to partner with Dell OEM Solutions not only for its support package but more specifically the battery life of the Latitude tablet. With the eye tracker running, the battery lasts for eight or nine hours even when streaming video, using WiFi and alternating brightness.

The removable battery means that users can swap batteries when they’re out and about, further increasing running time."

Via: Dell

Image credit: Dell

— By on September 19, 2013, 8:31 PM PST

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure