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Energy drinks of the future will keep you buzzed all day

Posting in Energy

The FDA may be wary of caffeine-enhanced products, but one company is seeking ways to make our bodies respond even more strongly to energy drinks.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is concerned that a number of high-caffeine products on the market -- including energy drinks such as Monster, Relentless and Red Bull -- may be doing more harm than good. In May, a group of doctors urged the agency to take action which prevents minors from consuming such items, arguing that too much caffeine may be hazardous to their health.

Red Bull was banned in France for 12 years, and a common ingredient in energy drinks -- Taurine -- is banned in countries including Denmark and Norway.

Ahead of any FDA crackdown, some firms are researching ways to make humans respond more strongly to lower doses of caffeine. ChromaDex, a licenser of natural ingredients which are produced synthetically, has released human clinical trial results for Purenergy -- an ingredient which releases 30 percent more caffeine into your bloodstream, and is absorbed at a rate 30 percent lower than usual.

The caffeine-related ingredient lasts longer than standard energy drinks, and delivers a higher kick for a smaller amount of caffeine -- which, if placed in drinks, could circumvent future FDA caffeine limits while ensuring you get your fix.

ChromaDex CEO Frank Jaksch, Jr says that by combining Purenergy with another chemical, pTeroPure, caffeine absorption is intensified. The firm is seeking out marketing opportunities for the alternative to traditional energy drink components, however, any drinks containing the ingredients will be "premium-priced," as the process to bond the ingredients through crystallization doesn't come cheap.

Via: Fast Co.Exist

Image credit: Flickr

— By on October 21, 2013, 7:43 PM PST

Charlie Osborne

Contributing Editor

Charlie Osborne is a freelance journalist and photographer based in London. In addition to SmartPlanet, she also writes for business technology website ZDNet and consumer technology site CNET. She holds a degree in medical anthropology from the University of Kent. Follow her on Twitter. Disclosure